Clapping. Parents. Weird hats. Yup, it's graduation times.

1. Don’t fall over

There will always be one, and you really don’t want it to be you. Even though no-one else will remember, *you* will and you may find yourself in a video like this.


2. No seriously, don’t fall over

You walk around perfectly most of the time. You’re definitely capable of making it this time. Believe in yourself!

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3. An official photo is nice (unless you have to pay for it)

Official photos at graduations usually carry a wince-inducing price tag. Fortunately, your parents are really proud you made it and they probably have more money than you. Draw whatever conclusion you like from this.

4. Be careful with your degree

It’s worth remembering that you actually get your physical degree after you graduate. It’s a small piece of paper that symbolises hundreds of hours of labour, thousands of pounds of debt, and your ticket to adulthood. I got food on mine within minutes of receiving it. Don’t make the same mistake I did.

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5. Take selfies. Hundreds of selfies.

Selfies are great, especially when it’s a cool day and you’re wearing an awesome hat. Take as many damn selfies as you want.

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6. Get your robes right

This could be your only chance to get photos of your time at university that you won’t be ashamed to show your children. Make sure you’re dressed accordingly and you haven’t got your robes tucked into your socks, or something. Enlist the help of friends/ family to make sure you look fresh. As fresh as one can in a mortarboard, at least.

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7. Don’t go overboard at the free drinks

There’s a good chance your department will host some sort of reception before or after the ceremony itself. This may involve the eternal student siren call- a free bar. If you do find yourself with access to whatever class of champagne your department’s budget could stretch to, don’t overdo it. As well as the obvious risks, you don’t want to find yourself needing a mid-ceremony wee.


8. Pace out your clapping

Nothing can prepare you for how much clapping you have to do at a graduation ceremony. Every individual, speaker and announcement will get a round of applause and you need to be prepared. Don’t go all out on the first round of people crossing the stage. Instead sustain a composed but consistent clapping rate throughout or risk ending up with sore hands.

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9. Accept that your parents are going to meet your university friends

If they haven’t already, I’m afraid now is the time. Don’t worry though, you’re all now officially adults so awkwardness will (probably) be kept to a minimum.

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10.   Aim your hat throw carefully

You’ve paid thousands of pounds to throw that damn hat, you need to show it who’s boss. Pro tip: flick your wrist slightly when you throw to ensure it lands safely behind you. Also, try and avoid elbowing the person next to you.

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11. Have fun!

Graduation is a unique event (yes, unless you’re going on to postgrad study, no need to be pedantic) and you should make the most of it. Be silly with your friends. Feel like you’re part of something. Get drunk afterwards, if that’s your bag. Have fun: it’s your day to celebrate all the hard work you’ve done in your degree.

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12.   Don’t think about the future

Congratulations, you’re a graduate! The future lies ahead and it’s looking bright. Just don’t think about how hard it’ll be going into full time employment after years of the student life. Don’t think about your student debt either, or the uncertainty facing our country and the world beyond it. It’ll be fine. Don’t think about it. Don’t think about it.

Woo, celebration time! And nothing says celebration like moving back into your parents' house and watching Euro 2016. Check out our 16 Problems You Face After Moving Home For Summer or read our Bluffers' Guide to Euro 2016. What's that? The only UK team left in the tournament is Wales?! Dammit Roy!

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