Get the real picture on the courses and modules at over 120 universities in the UK by reading through the reviews and ratings left by thousands of students and get true insight into what it's really like to study at that institution. With over 30,000 reviews left by students in the last 12 months, Student Hut is the most up-to-date and comprehensive resource of student reviews in the UK.

Rating summary
The University of Nottingham 4.1 / 1245 reviews
Overall rating
5 stars
446
4 stars
573
3 stars
151
2 stars
53
1 stars
22
Module / Course content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Module Review:
Module Code:
F14AP2
Anonymous

Very distinct difference between the lecturers, although both parts of the course looked like something I would enjoy on paper, astrochemistry and quantum chemistry.The astrochemistry part of the course turned out to be aweful. The lecturer didn't understand the content, couldn't lecture well to the audience because of it, contantly pausing as they didn't understand it. Also, when asked for help, they favoured students which who were undergoing research projects under them, compared to other students. Also, when confronted with evidence that the 'facts' they'd presented were wrong, didn't clarify why they were presented wrong and which they would accept as correct.The quantum chemistry part was extremely enjoyable on the other hand. The lecturer knew what they were talking about, lectured extremely well, gave sound advice and clear notes.

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Module Review:
Module Code:
B13703
Anonymous

This is a third year module, and although quite complex it was an incredibly interesting module. From learning about pain pathways in humans, to how you could examine this experimentally using animal models, this module covered a wide range of topics. The module was examined using both a multiple choice/ short answer exam and a longer essay exam. Overall a great module.

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Anonymous

The course is divided into two sections; teaching skills and teaching creatively. There is ample room for debate on the current mode of teaching and whether it is working in the modern classroom. I found the tutorials on how to teach creative subjects fascinating.

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Module Review:
Module Code:
A12RSD
Anonymous

Module includes the study of respiratory dieseases and how to diagnose and treat them. Module has great balance of practicals, labs and clinical case studies. You will perform basic diagnostic examination techniques, used by doctors, and will learn how to identify abnormal lung conditions from dynamic lung function tests and associate diseases with them. The module incorporates pharmacology and you will learn about inhalers, anti-inflammatories and beta-blockers. The theory of the module includes lung pathology and anatomy with some basic anatomy classes. It is assessed with half coursework (2000 word diagnostic case report) and half examination. An optional module, but one taught by head of course and doctors. Definitely worth doing and gives real insight into the workings of a doctor in general practice etc.

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Module Review:
Module Code:
A34589
Anonymous

One of the most interesting modules in the course. More so, the lecturer, David Whynes, is an amazing one. I so wish he wasn't retiring and that the module hadn't been cancelled.

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Module Review:
Module Code:
XX4TT1
Anonymous

This is one of the more interesting modules as you are split into small groups with students from other subjects across the PGCE cohort. This lends itself naturally to more diverse and engaging discussions. The topics are also interesting as they range from sexuality to safeguarding to theories in education.

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Module Review:
Module Code:
V81001
Anonymous

This module is unique amongst my course, feeling more like a weekly theological book club than an academic module. The course is structured so that every week you read another great religious text, and then meet up to discuss its ideas with your fellow students in a weekly seminar, guided by the seminar leader. This structure is brilliant as it means it is exceedingly clear, and additionally is arguably the closest thing you will come to 'leisure reading' which also counts towards you credits. The content is fantastic, giving you a real feel for the variety of religious texts and also gives you a sense for how to interact with a text in original. The teaching is great, with the seminar leaders smoothly guiding the group into areas of discussion, but in such away that the groups own discussion and insights takes precedent. The only criticism is that assessment is by exam only and I feel this does not allow students to showcase the depth of insight into these texts that student gain from this module, which is its biggest strength.

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Module Review:
Module Code:
M32156
Anonymous

Overall my favourite module with top educators teaching it. The content is enjoyable and easy to follow and although complex, can be applied to every day life making it rather fun,

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Module Review:
Module Code:
B11103
Anonymous

i FOUND THE MODULE VERY ENOYABLE BUT I FELT THAT THERE WAS LITTLE GUIDANCE AS TO HOW THE STUDENTS WERE GOING TO BE EXAMINED ON THE CONTENT. THIS LIMITED THE ABILITY OF MANY OF US TO REVISE AND MEANT THAT WE FELT RATHER VULNERABLE GOING INTO THE EXAM. IT WOULD BE NICE TO HAVE CONSISTENT REMINDERS OF THE EXTENT TO WHICH THE RESEARCH PRESENTED TO US NEEDED TO BE LEARNT/UNDERSTOOD.

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor
Course review:
Anonymous
Reviewer:

in terms of structure, German Studies is laid out so that you have a compulsory language module which consists of two seminars and one tutorial every week- the tutorial is focused on grammar whereas the seminars are for language. You then get to choose optional modules such as German Literature, Translation Studies, German History etc. (So a broad range of topics). However in the first year there are no oral classes (although you are encouraged to speak German in the seminars) which was a drawback for me as speaking is my weakest point. 90% of the lectures are interesting (you'll always get one or two you that are positively dull), but I would suggest that if you know you do better in exams (or in coursework) to read each module description and see how they're assessed. e.g. I prefer coursework, so whilst I have four essays to write, I have very few exams which I prefer. Nothing is very complex and you can always ask for help, and I would also recommend doing the reading that is set, you can get away without doing it but certainly do for any core modules as you may need it in the future. The exams are relatively straightforward, in regards to language you have an exam much like the A Level one, with a grammar section, a comprehension and an essay, you do not have an oral exam until the summer term. The first year is slightly more structured than the second, as they are trying to get everyone to the same level of German (reasonably) but in second year you have much more freedom to choose modules you think you'll enjoy- or are related to what you want to do (if you have any idea!) such as Literary Translation, especially as these interests can shape what you do on your year abroad. In regards to that, you have a compulsory year in German as with any language degree, and you can choose to work, teach or study. In terms of classes, it is one of the smaller degrees- certainly compared to science subjects- so most lectures aren't in lecture theatres but classrooms with not that many people (30-40 max) and seminars are similarly small. You also have the options to start (or continue) learning another language, which I would recommend, or you could choose a module completed unrelated to your degree such as Art History or Psychology if you have a module to fill. Overall I really enjoy German Studies, no degree is perfect but I would certainly recommend it to someone who has done the A Level and is considering pursuing languages in the future.

Module content
Teaching quality
Learning resources
Academic support
Assessments & feedback
Enjoyment factor