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Rating summary
London School of Economics and Political Science 4.1 / 227 reviews
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Anonymous
Reviewer:

1) Really interesting courses and wide variety of module choice.2) However, modules are very exam-based, not a lot of alternative assessment methods.3) Teaching quality is really good in my experience.

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Anonymous
Reviewer:

Personally I think the course provides a very good, brief but with certain level of difficulty as well as critical thinking kind of challenges which I like. The teaching overall was okay but what I really find useful was the fact that they record lectures and prepare loads of useful notes and exercises that really helps in providing a better understanding but one has to do a lot of self study.

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Anonymous
Reviewer:

The course content is very interesting as a whole and covers quite a wide variety of topics both in social policy and government allowing you to find out and choose what particularly interests you. the majority of the work is however independent study so you have to be quite self motivated to undertake this course.

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Anonymous
Reviewer:

Although I heard LSE had a very independent approach to teaching and learning, I didn't appreciate or expect the extent to which this was true until I had gotten here. Expect very few contact hours -- which is liberating in some ways for a first year student living on their own in the wonderful city of London, but also really challenging hecause you'll soon realize it really is up to you to pull yourself up and get to work. There are academic advisors and class teachers that are meant to keep you in check and monitor your progress, but you really can get to the point of not showing up altogether without encountering anything more than an automated email noting you have been absent for two weeks in a row. I think this independence thing really does make you mature in a lot of ways, and instilled a sense of initiative that you might not have had before? It's hard to explain. Another thing is that I'd say LSE is more homogenous than not. Although yes, there are many students from different countries, you'll find that students tend to stick to students from their own countries. And within those groups of nationalities, it's actually just a handful of schools they came from, so they are quite familiar with each other -- which can be disheartening at times as it can feel a bit like an impenetrable bubble of culture, history, interest, and language that you won't be a part of. Everyone's pretty nice, though, and there's likely never the intent to exclude! LSE students are also all studying more or less related subjects, which is a plus that you encounter people from other majors but also a downside in that everyone's pursuing similar futures in a handful of industries. It really is all about work and careers at LSE, so again you have to take the initiative to make your university experience your own. Best of luck!

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Anonymous
Reviewer:

The course is very good and the compulsory modules are very interesting and easy to approach. I choose government without another option (like history or economics), so that gives you a lot of scope to pick other modules in different subject areas. Teaching is generally good, and classes are usually quite varied and interesting. LSE is a very social science dedicated university with an excellent reputation, so you can get a lot of very interesting visitors and lecturers.

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Course review:
Anonymous
Reviewer:

The content of this degree is very enjoyable if you like maths- if not then this is not the economics degree for you. The lecturers for the core modules (micro, macro, econometrics etc) are quite good, but the teaching is not at all supportive or particularly good, so this course is better for independent learners- the teachers are most postgrads who clearly dont really care or know how to teach. They really don't spoon feed you at all- the worst thing is they don't give us answers to past exam papers!

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Anonymous
Reviewer:

The lecturers for the core modules (micro, macro, econometrics etc.) are quite good and the content is interesting as long as you're fairly interested in maths. The teaching system is not supportive at all, so this course is best for independent learners. Having both january and summer term exams means that you don't actually get a holiday for the entire academic year, so be prepared to work around the clock for the whole year. The worst thing about this degree is that they don't give answers to past exams!

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Anonymous
Reviewer:

Very intellectual, but require a lot hard of work. Somehow hard and little help offered by the faculty and school. Academic staff can be helpful or unhelpful. Some has good readlist, some are bad. EXAMS are super hard and stressful environment where mental health of students are not cared of. Poor resources on students' well being and experience. In all fairness, research are worldclass and LSE is able to recruit top notched academics and politicians....

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Anonymous
Reviewer:

I have greatly enjoyed my time at LSE studying Politics and Philosophy. In the first year your four modules are all compulsory and there is no choice so that is worth bearing in mind. From there choice open up. Overall, the degree allows one to take political science courses, political theory courses, ethics courses and philosophy of science courses. There are also two modules you can take as outside option.

Most of these modules are assessed through a coursework essay (25-33% of marks normally) and an exam. In your 3rd year more of the modules are assessed purely by coursework, which I preferred.

Nothing is too hard and anyone who gets in to the course should do fine as long as they put in some work. I really enjoyed myself and have tended to put in the effort which normally has rewarding results.

The teaching is mixed, but mostly of a good quality. Some lecturers are a bit dry, but others are extremely good. The class teachers can also be mixed, but it is rare that one is so bad that you will be much worse off for it. I recommend picking courses where you have heard good things about the lecturers.

As I said overall I have had a great time; I have loved the content and the political theory/philosophy modules in particular. LSE's analytic philosophy style really suited me. The only thing I would improve would be to have a bit more flexibility in the first and second years when it comes to picking modules! Luckily requests can be made to go outside of programme regulations as long as one is doing well academically.

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Anonymous
Reviewer:

I was expecting my degree to be more political, but in studying 'government' or 'political science' a lot of the politics is sucked out of it, leaving you to study the bare theory behind what's actually going on in the world. I found a lot of it quite dry, and a lot of the course choices were dry and uninteresting too. I'm in my final year of graduating and still don't feel confident in discussing political situations around the world, which I think is where my degree falls down. Teaching isn't great - some lecturers or teachers don't respond to emails, provide adequate lecture notes, and my academic adviser gave me poor advise about coping with clashing courses.

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