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Rating summary
The University of Bristol 4.1 / 446 reviews
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5 stars
136
4 stars
231
3 stars
56
2 stars
18
1 stars
5
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Mohamed Thoufique Ziyavudeen
Reviewer:
4th Year

My first year at University of Bristol was simply just above average. First year of Aerospace Engineering was filled with so much theory and practicals and I personally found it very challenging. We had the privilege to study other mandatory units from other departments like Mechancial Engineering and Engineering Maths. Luckily, first year did not count towards my overall degree and it simply a taster of what comes next. 

Second year was the most challenging among all four years. It was hard due to increased content of theory and complexity of mathematics and physics. This is the year which united all specialized fields such as Aerodynamics, Flight mechanics and Control, and Structures and Materials. Each specialization can be focused on fixed wing, rotary wing and space. 

Thrid year was a bit more relaxing than 1st and 2nd second years. It involved individual research projects, group projects and optional units where we can choose whatever topic that we wish to study. However, the choice for individual projects are limited and the performance of 2nd year results siginificantly affects the choice. Courseworks were lot harder than 2nd second year and far more technical than you can actually imagine.

Fourth year was on harder but not as hard as second year. At this point everyone must have specialized in Aerodynamics, Flight mechanics and control or Sturctures and Composite materials. Aerodynamics involves more CFD simulations and programming, Flight mechanics and control focused on Matlab programming and structures and composites materials focused on experiments and FEA modelling. Group projects and Individual projects again worth 70 credits in total and the rest the credits are purely optional. 

Overall, the course content was perfectly made but the lecture style and problem sheet presentations were not up to standards. Improvements are being made over the past 2 years. I would highly recommend this degree to any with interest in space, aircrafts, helicopters and UAVs. Pure maths, physics and coding skills are highly recommended before stepping into university. 

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Anonymous
Reviewer:

So my experience of medicine at Bristol has been fantastic. Year 1 sets you up with basic scientific knowledge and towards the end of the year you get to start looking at the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. Year 2 gives you an insight into neurology, renal and gastrointestinal medicine. After year 2, half the year either intercalate (I chose to do physiology) or continue into third year. After this I can't really comment on what happens as I haven't done it yet!! Our exams so far have mainly been multiple choice so even if you have no idea, you can make a guess! The structure of teaching is set to change, with a new curriculum coming in, I'm not hugely sure what impact this will have. However, from my experience, Bristol is great - it's a lovely city with lots of places to go out, and I don't regret doing medicine!

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Anonymous
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Veterinary Sciences at Bristol is definitely the course for me. The content is interesting and engaging but not impossible as first thought. The workload is manageable but hard. We have 2 lots of exams a year in January and Summer and have full timetable teaching thought the year including practicals and lectures. In the first 3 years we do pre clinical study- learning about the normal anatomy and physiology tided in with animal management and husbandry. In year 3 we start to look at clinical aspects including more disease, treatment and surgery which continues into year 4 and 5. Im currently in second year and although were currently in exam season I still love my degree!

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Anonymous
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Good flexibility in choosing modules in second and third year; you can take more of a global development/management spin on economics rather than accounting and finance for example. Core modules have a fairly hefty focus on econometrics the whole way though, including a semi-optional econometrics project in your third year. Steer clear of Bristol Econ if you're not into your maths/stats. The whole course is also very exam heavy - minimal coursework. But lecturers all fab, global development modules incredibly interesting and good econ events set up by the committee!

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Anonymous
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My degree is very time consuming because I'm basically doing an English literature degree but in French, so always have lots of reading and for example, at the moment 3 essays and 6nexams. I find it really interesting because I love analysing books and poems etc but in terms of French language I feel that my level of knowledge has dropped considerably since A-level.

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Anonymous
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I feel like sociology is one of those courses that progressively gets better the longer you're there. By the time you get into your third year (like me) - there's a lot more scope to study the things that really interest you. That department is fairly small, so chances are, you'll soon become well accustomed with the professors and probably most of the students in your year. In terms of content, the first year is all the basics: questions of identity and classical sociological theory. I quite enjoyed my first year - it was fairly relaxed and there was a lot of academic support. Bristol is not very good for pastoral care tbh, but one of the good things about the sociology department is that it is fairly small, so you can get the support you need - to some extent. In general, you'll get assessed through formative and summarise assessments (formatives don't count- think of them as practice assessments, these usually occur in the middle of the term and usually come in the form of essays or presentations) and obviously summarises count they'll be in the form of essays or exams in January or May. Overall, I've enjoyed my university experience, I think the content of the modules got more interesting as my degree went on. The department is fairly democratic and its comparatively easier to implement change on your course than other faculties/faculties.

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Anonymous
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University of Bristol is an excellent institution to study law at. I am glad I came here to study,

If you are seeking an LLB course that engages critically with the law to gain an in depth understanding, then this is the course for you. The academic staff are excellent at teasing out issues and encouraging wider, critical thinking of the law, its function and development.

However, it is important to consider the structure and teaching methods of your course. For instance, the teaching style in Bristol is fairly theoretical with comparatively fewer opportunities to practically engage with the material outside of problem questions and essay questions. For instance, if you are looking for a course that incorporates mooting into the syllabus then this may not be the course for you. That said, there are plenty of chances to engage in such activities outside of the classroom.

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Anonymous
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I have thoroughly enjoyed my biology degree at bristol.You learn from some of the most prominent researchers in the field. Biology I believe is what Bristol does best and there are so many opportunities throughout the course to get involved with projects and internships. We have an employability module as well which is useful for deciding and being prepared for future careers. The course is based on plants and animals, not really covering physiology of humans but has many units about genetics. The degree has definitely sparked interest in many things I had not thought about before coming to University and has given me a better sense of what I want to do later in life. The course is very broad so gives you a good understanding of the principles underpinnning biological research,preparing for many areas of work. I would highly recommend this course to anyone that enjoys biology.

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Anonymous
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The course content is very interesting and there's a lot of scope to tailor the course to your interests (you get to choose optional modules each year). The ability to do a year in industry also attracted me to the course though you do not get a lot of support in finding a placement - that is more down to you. The teaching is usually of high standard - the lecturers are all very passionate about what they teach.

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Anonymous
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I began studying at the University of Bristol in September 2014, since then I have completed first and second year and am currently nearly finished with my year abroad (easily the best part of my degree.

So I'll begin with the lowdown on first year: it was of course quite scary starting uni and having to meet new people and it was all a little bit crazy however my timetable for lectures and seminars was clear and easy to follow. I had a maximum of about 12 hours per week in uni and the workload wasn't too bad. The German language seminars were 2 hours on a Monday and an hour on a Thursday - I often didn't feel like I was making any progress from A Level German but the teachers were friendly and it was easy to get close to the other people in your seminar groups because there were only about 14 people per seminar group. The speaking assessments weren't too bad however the final exam at the end of the year I found really hard, I was badly prepared for the exam and wished my seminar tutor had given me more of a heads up as to what to expect from the exam (lots of grammar). There was also an online grammar course that everyone is supposed to complete in first year - its a grammar session every week to be done at home - I never got past week 5 however I would suggest actually doing it! The other units in first year were quite good and not so difficult, with the exception of the German poetry unit which I found completely boring and really hard to do well in the exam.

So second year, everything suddenly got like a million times harder. I had to really work hard and felt like I had very little help from uni - this is probably because I only had 7 hours in uni a week so there was a lot of independent research and self learning needed to do well in this year. I finally made use of the library - somewhere I'd never been in first year and found out it does have a good selection of useful books! My language improved this year and the language seminars focussed a lot on practical German needed for the year abroad, so like going to the doctors and renting out a flat and so on, so it was actually quite useful.

Third year, hands down the best year, planning my year abroad was easy because i went through the British Council to get a teaching placement - best idea ever. It means I always am paid and it's not the hardest job in the world. I live in Austria, yes the dialect was hard to begin with but it's really not that bad once you get used to it. My German has really improved the most this year without a doubt, but I obviously still will need to keep working on it in fourth year.

Overall it's a good uni to study German, it's not perfect, I'd personally like more hours in uni every week because I'd rather not have to do so much independent study, and I wish that first year German learning wasn't so grammar based.

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